ÍndiceÍndice  PortalPortal  RegistrarseRegistrarse  ConectarseConectarse  

Comparte | 
 

 More than Purdey By Terry Wielad

Ir abajo 
AutorMensaje
Ramse

2ª


Mensajes : 1768
Fecha de inscripción : 06/12/2012

MensajeTema: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Mar 13 Ago 2013, 00:51

[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]

El mismo texto, para copiar y pegar en el traductor del Google:

On January 3, 1880. a young London gun maker named Frederick Beeslev left his home at 22 Queen Street, off the Edgware Road, and made his way to Her Majesty's patent office. He was earning a packet of papers.
At the patent office. Beesley filed the provisional specifications for a mechanism he described as "a self opening hammerless gun." The patent application was assigned No. 31 for that year. Six months later, on July 2, Beesley signed the complete specification, and the next day it was filed in the Great Seal Patent Office.
None of those involved, even Beesley himself, could have had any notion that patent No. 1880/31 would become one of the most famous guns in history—a design so enduring it would still be in production more than 130 years later.
Had Beesley suspected, perhaps he would not have taken his patent to the shop of his old employer, James Purdev, and offered to sell it to him. But he did, and Purdev, searching at the time for a hammerless design worthy of his house, saw the possibilities. On July 29, 1880, he paid Beesley £55 for the rights to his design for 14 years. The first gun was completed later that same year—and to this day, Purdev has never made a "best" side-bv-side to any other pattern.
Much has been made of the one-sided nature of this transaction. After all, Purdev made a fortune and, it could be argued, owes its continued survival to the excellence of this design. But Beesley benefited as well, and handsomely. In 1880, £55 was the price of a "best" gun from the finest house—or almost six months wages for a skilled craftsman. Many years later, Beesley?s granddaughters attested to the fact that the money allowed their grandfather to establish himself in the
trade, to move eventually from the Edgware Road to St. James, and to become a significant competitor to his former employer.
The Woodward "Automatic" *left) and the Lancaster "Wrist Breaker" were two of the most famous and widely used English shotgun actions of the late Victorian age.
As yet unrestored, this Gibbs & Pitt's gun, patented in 1873 and proofed with 2i2;-inch blackpowder cartridges, survived years of shooting with 234-ineh heavy smokeless waterfowl loads, and was still perfectly tight. The original French walnut stock is gorgeous.
In 1880. however, Frederick Beeslev was just 33 years old, and both business and life were a struggle. A qualified gun maker who apprenticed with William Moore & Grey and later worked for James Purdev, among others, Beeslev had been on his own for barely a year, when he perfected the design that became patent No. 31. He was already known as a skilled., perfectionist workman and a talented innovator, but these traits alone were not enough to get established in the
intensely competitive world of London gunmaking.
Beeslev was working from the Queen Street house, where he. his wife, and their two children shared the premises with more than a dozen other people.
Although he started an order book of his own, in 1871, nine years later he had produced fewer than a hundred guns, and he was not getting rich.
Even at that time, Beesley's interest lay more in invention than production. As he later recounted, the inspiration for patent No. 31 came from studying the workings of John Stanton's rebounding lock, patented in 1867 and employed on the vast majority of hammer guns from that day forward. Stanton had recognized that the two arms of a V-spring had potential for use in more than one function in a mechanism. In his design, the longer arm propels the hammer forward, and the shorter one moves the hammer back from the striker to its half-cock position. In the transfer of tension from one arm to the other and back again, Frederick Beeslev saw the basis for a revolutionary design, and so it proved to be. With it, Purdey has set the standard against which every other shotgun action, all over the world, has been measured ever since.
This 10-bore has had a hard century of life, but is still perfectly functional.
Significant as Beeslev's design was, the history of the London gun neither begins nor ends with patent No. 31. But it did signal the end of a remarkable 30-year period that had revolutionized the world of shooting.
This W&C Scott double rifle has back-action locks and conventional barrel-cocking, one of the many variations found on this action.
Histories of this period in gunmaking usually begin with the Great Exhibition of 1851, which is reasonable, because it was there that Casimir Lefaucheux displayed his break-action breechloader. That action led to Joseph Lang producing the first such London gun. But there is far more to it than that. Between 1840 and 1880, the planets aligned in an unprecedented way, revolutionizing the world of shooting, gunmaking. and English society itself.
W&C Scott guns were beautifully made. Their patented fore-end release, unique to Scott guns, is a work of art.
In 1840, Queen Victoria married her cousin, the German Prince Albert. The Prince brought with him to England a passionate love of shooting. Since Waterloo, English aristocrats had been enthusiastic shooters, and many great estates were known for their grouse and partridge. Now, with royal imprimatur, enthusiasm for the pastime engulfed society. Happily, this coincided with the expansion of railways, which allowed swift travel to distant points. Combined with the expansion
of driven shooting, this made possible that great English institution, the shooting weekend. Even the Great Exhibition itself, where Lang first saw the Lefaucheux gun, can be laid at the feet of Prince Albert. The royal had a strong interest in industry and the arts, and the exhibition was both his idea and his creation.
Original drawings of the Woodward "Automatic" from The Field, reproduced in The British Shotgun, *Vol. II, Crudgington & Baker).
The wealthy class had developed a lasting passion for shooting and demanded guns that were ever better and more finely made. In London, the Manton brothers had already fostered the principle that a gun should be a fine implement, not a crude tool. So, London attracted the most talented gun makers and inventors in the country, and they set about refining the basic break-action shotgun that Joseph Lang unveiled in 1853.
Between 1850 and 1880, guns evolved from percussion to pinfire to centerfire, from muzzleloader to breechloader, from hammers to hammerless, and from blackpowder to the first smokeless propellants. Never before or since has so much been accomplished in so short a period, and the impetus was competition and serious money.
The rise in driven shooting for grouse, partridge, and pheasant became practical only after the introduction of the self-contained cartridge. Once established, however, it became the driving force behind further improvements, encouraging gun makers to refine their products as they sought speed of use, efficiency of motion, and durability.
This quest for greater speed and convenience began as soon as the centerfire cartridge replaced the pinfire, in the early 1860s, and it was realized the centerfire hammer gun could be improved in a number of ways. One was to find a "snap" action for closing, in which the locking bolts would snap home on their own as the gun was closed, thereby eliminating the need for a separate motion by the shooter, such as pushing a lever back into position. Another was a means of cocking
the hammers automatically as the gun was opened. A third was to find a way to eject empty cartridge cases, rather than having the shooter pick out the hulls manually.
Gun makers all over the country tackled these challenges. Through the 1860s, more than 100 patents were filed for different types of snap actions alone. Several makers realized that, with the move to centerfire cartridges, there was no longer any real need for external hammers. The entire mechanism could be moved inside the gun, protecting hammers and strikers from the elements. At the same time, it raised more questions: without a visible hammer, how was the shooter to
know the gun was cocked? And, if it was cocked, what kind of safety mechanism would be needed to prevent accidental discharges?
Today, we look at a side-bv-side shotgun and see what has become the standard form. The barrels pivot downward on a hinge pin. The movement of the barrels cocks the tumblers. Two underlugs on the barrels fit into a slot in the action and, when the barrels are closed, they are locked in place by a sliding bolt. This bolt is operated by a toplever connected to a spindle down through the frame. A double safety mechanism both blocks the triggers and prevents the tumblers from
falling accidentally. Selective ejectors automatically expel fired hulls. All the features just described were invented and patented in England in the 1860s and 70s.
Although many credit William Anson and John Deeley, of Westley Richards in Birmingham, with inventing the first hammerless action (the Anson & Deeley boxlock, in 1875) it was not the first, nor was it even the first really successful one (although, in terms of sheer numbers, it went on to become the dominant double-shotgun design of all time). By the 1870s, several gun makers were trying to create a true hammerless action. The major challenge was not to move the tumblers inside, but to find a means of cocking them.
Out of this period sprang four actions that achieved considerable success at the time and were made in sufficient numbers that we still find them for sale today.
One was invented in Bristol, one in Birmingham, and two in London. One is, for lack of a better term, a boxlock, while another is a hybrid via a mechanism that can be married to either a boxlock or sidelock. They all have two common qualities. One, they were so good they were adopted and made, usually under license, by several companies. The second was that the guns themselves were so sound that many are still in use today. These actions are the Gibbs & Pitt's (Bristol, 1873), the W&C Scott (Birmingham, 1878), Woodward's Automatic (London, 1876), and the Lancaster "Wrist Breaker" (London, 1884). Each has a distinct place in the history of the development of the English shotgun, and that significance can best be understood by looking at them chronologically.
The interior of a Lancaster lock, seen here from the bottom and side, made to the first variation of the Wrist Breaker self-opening design, this one employing a V-spring instead of a straight leaf spring.
The idea of a hammerless (or internal hammer) gun can be traced back to the days of flintlocks, but the first successful design for such a gun is generally acknowledged to be Theophilus Murcott's gun of 1871. Murcott was a successful London gun maker, and his design employed internal tumblers with a push-forward underlever to cock them.
Two years later, in Bristol, rifle maker George Gibbs and his partner, Thomas Pitt, designed another lever-operated action, this one with the mechanism on the trigger plate. Gibbs was a well-known gun maker who worked closely with William Metford, and his products were highly respected throughout the country.
Other gun makers—including James Purdey—marketed guns and rifles built on the Gibbs & Pitt's patent. (In 1875, Anson and Deeley designed the boxlock that became the world standard for such guns, and though it cut into the Gibbs & Pitt's market, it did not eliminate it.)
We go now to London, where the famous firm of J. Woodward & Sons was also tackling the question of hammerless guns. James Woodward apprenticed with Charles Moore, an established London gun maker of high reputation. Eventually, the company became Moore & Woodward, and then, in 1872, J. Woodward & Sons. The company was known for making the finest of guns, in a class with Purdey and Boss, and was also very inventive.
In 1876, Woodward filed patent No. 600, in conjunction with Thomas Southgate, for a mechanism employing a push-forward underlever that would both unlock the barrels and automatically cock the external hammers of a conventional gun. They called this the "Automaton" or "Automatic"—probably the first use of that word in connection with firearms.
For Woodward to make a hammerless gun, it was a simple matter to move the tumblers inside the lock plates and use the same mechanism to cock them, which it did. The company launched a major advertising campaign in the periodicals of the day, licensed their design to other gun makers, and made guns on which other makers put their names. The "Automatic" became Woodward's entry in the hammerless race, and was used for both shotguns and rifles.
The Lancaster is distinguished by its leg-of-mutton lock plates and rounded frame. It is an ergonomic delight, in spite of its Wrist Breaker nickname.
In Birmingham, W&C Scott, one of the largest, most famous, and certainly among the finest English gun makers, was also looking for a hammerless design. The firm decided to use the fall of the barrels as the cocking mechanism. There was also concern as to how the shooter would know the gun was cocked, and Scott resolved that with its patented "crystal indicator," a small glass porthole through which could be seen the cocked tumbler. This, together with its distinctive lock
plate, made the Scott instantly recognizable.
The action became known as the "Classic Scott" and was, again, licensed and marketed under other names. The most famous user was Holland & Holland, which marketed it as the "Climax." So famous did H&H later become that many today think it was that firm that invented it.
By 1881, all of these designs were in production. Some were produced to exclusive patents, others were made under license, or the patentees manufactured guns on which other gun makers put their names. But, the one thing the English gun trade was lacking was a generic design available to all. In 1881, the Rogers brothers of Birmingham solved that problem.
The Rogers brothers were actioners who, in effect, rescued smaller gun makers by patenting an action that eventually became the standard design for members of the trade who lacked one of their own. The Rogers action is the most commonly found, and imitated, of all the English sidelock designs, yet is virtually unknown by its real name. The immediately recognizable characteristic of the Rogers is the cocking levers that protrude from the knuckle of the frame. Frederick
Beeslev, having sold patent No. 31 to Purdey, was on his way to becoming "inventor to the London trade," as he is now remembered. When he died in 1928, Beesley had 25 patents to his name of which, undoubtedly, the Purdey is the most famous. But it is not the best.
Patent drawing for Frederick Beesley's patent No. 42.5 of 1884 in its original boxlock configuration. Adapted to a sidelock mechanism, it became the Lancaster Wrist Breaker.
Although Beesley's shop window at 2 St. James's Street proclaimed him "inventor and patentee of Purdev's hammerless gun." he himself believed it could be improved upon., and he set out to do so.
In 1884. Beeslev filed another patent, this one No. 425. Like most English patents, the description is deliberately vague, intended that way to put rivals off the scent. But it describes an ingenious mechanism that employs a single leaf spring to perform three distinct and vital functions: cocking the tumbler, powering it forward, and then opening the action.
Beesley considered this a significant refinement of the principle used in the Purdev patent—it was simpler, stronger, and it did more with less. It was a mechanism that could be adapted to either boxlock or sidelock, and, indeed, the initial patent filing describes it as a boxlock. Although Beesley made some guns to the patent, the majority were manufactured by Charles Lancaster, where it became famous as the "Wrist Breaker," so called because of the resistance in closing it against spring pressure. Lancaster was one of London's oldest, largest, and most prestigious firms, and it used the action in thousands of shotguns and rifles.
With the filing of patent No. 425, the only major action yet to appear was the Holland & Holland "Royal," in 1885. In a remarkable 15-vear period, between the appearance of "Murcott's Mousetrap," in 1871, and the Lancaster "Wrist Breaker" in 1884, the English shotgun had evolved into the form we know today.
The Gibbs and Pitt's Action The Gibbs & Pitt's action was invented by George Gibbs and Thomas Pitt of Bristol, and patented in 1873, two years after Murcott's first hammerless design, and two years before the Anson & Deeley. Like the Murcott, it was a lever-cocked design that could be adapted to a variety of lock mechanisms, of which the most commonly seen is a trigger-plate lock that protrudes from the action forward of the trigger guard. The Gibbs & Pitt's is very strong, and it was employed in both rifles and shotguns. Donald Dallas, who has studied the history of the English gun trade and written several books on the subject, estimates 10,000 guns were made to this pattern.
An early model Gibbs & Pitt's 12-bore shotgun with imderlever cocking and trigger plate lock. This is a very strong and durable action that was used on both shotguns and rifles. The T-shaped wooden plug indicates that it w as originally built with the very early side safety, then replaced with the more reliable swinging lever.
James Purdev is known to have used the Gibbs and Pitt's action, among others, during the brief period between the appearance of the hammerless gun and Purdev's adoption of the Beeslev self-opener, in 1880.
Although the Gibbs & Pitt's appears strange to our eyes today, with its unusual frame and under-hung lock, it is both strong and dependable and makes into a light and well balanced gun. Gibbs' guns were beautifully made. The gun shown here is original condition, at least 125 years old, and although it has 2 1/2 inch chambers and blackpowder proof, survived a lifetime of shooting heavy 2 3/4 -inch smokeless duck loads and is still as tight as the day it left Gibbs' shop in Corn Street.
The Gibbs & Pitt's was designed in the very early days of hammerless actions, when gunmakers were experimenting with a variety of approaches for cocking mechanisms and safety catches. The early models used underlevers, but later examples are seen with toplevers.
Gibbs & Pitt's actions were beautifully made. The patent emblem indicates a gun made by Gibbs. not under license by another maker.
The Classic Scott W&C Scott & Sons was one of the largest and best gunmakers in Birmingham. A son. William Middleditch Scott, patented the Scott spindle that, married to Purdev's double underlug, became the standard bolting mechanism for double guns to this day. Purdev held the license for the combination in London., and Scott in Birmingham, profitting both greatly.
In 1878, Scott patented the action that became known as the "Classic Scott." most famous as Holland's "Climax." So well-known did the Climax become, many today think it was H&H's patent.
W&C Scott worked closely with Holland in the years before H&H built its London factory on Harrow Road (1893), and most of Holland's guns and rifles came from Scott's, to be finished in London.The Scott name is better known abroad than in England, where it mainly supplied guns and rifles to the trade for others (like H&H) to engrave with their own name. In the U.S., however, the Scott name became very well known. Captain Adam Bogardus was a particular admirer of Scott guns, and thousands were exported to the U.S.
The Classic Scott is recognizable by a number of features, including the distinctive lock-plate shape and the small glass porthole (crystal indicator) that allows the shooter to see whether the tumbler is cocked. The action is cocked by the falling of the barrels, and Scott tried a number of approaches to this. The best known employs a hook on each side that fit into slots in the action flats. As the barrels drop, the hooks pull the cocking rod forward, pivoting the tumbler back. In one
variation, there are coil springs around the rods, which then power the tumbler forward.
Because of the distinctive shape, the Classic Scott is usually described as a "back action" sidelock (meaning the spring is behind the tumbler, rather than in the bar of the action), but this is not necessarily the case.
Donald Dallas describes the Classic Scott as "beautifully made." They are also strong and reliable and are seen on all types of guns, from smallbore double rifles up to massive 8-gauge shotguns.
W&C Scott merged with Philip Webley, in 1897, to become Webley & Scott. In the years that followed, the Scott name was put on the firm's fine doubles. When the company fell on hard times, after 1945, W&C Scott was divested, then later acquired, ironically, by Holland & Holland. The Classic Scott can be found with many different names engraved on the locks, but all were made by Scott'. They are fine and under-appreciated guns.
A 10-bore Classic Scott, with its trademark Crystal Indicator.
Woodward's Automatic
James Woodward & Sons was in the absolute top echelon of London gunmakers, mentioned in the same breath as Purdev and Boss. James the elder learned the trade with Charles Moore, brought his sons James and Charles into the business, and became J. Woodward & Sons, in 1872.
Although it remained a small family firm for its 80-vear existence (it was absorbed by Purdey in 1948, the only company Purdev ever acquired), the Woodwards were inventors, as well as the finest of gunmakers.
In 1876, James the younger collaborated with the well-known inventor Thomas Southgate to patent an underlever cocking action for hammer guns, called the "Automaton." This mechanism (patent No. 600) was easily adapted to a hammerless sidelock with tumblers and, as such, was called "The Automatic." It was widely advertised, and the name is engraved on the rib near the standing breech. Woodward made a specialty of underlever guns, employing several types from the swiveling Jones underlever to push-forward "snap action" underlevers and the tumbler-cocking snap underlever of the Automatic.
Traditionally, Woodward's main rival in the trade was Boss & Co., which favored sidelevers, until the firm was acquired by John Robertson, in 1892. Robertson not only refined Boss' game guns, he invented the Boss over/under and selective single trigger. Woodward followed suit with an over/under and single trigger of its own and, today, the Woodward over/under is widely considered the finest ever made. Purdey's major motive for buying Woodward, in 1948, was to obtain the
over/under design for themselves.
Although the quality of its guns was never questioned, the Woodwards were known for being somewhat iconoclastic. The firm favored 29-inch barrels, while others made theirs 30 inches. Woodwards featured half-pistol hands, when others insisted on straight grips, and their walnut was known for its flair. Among engraving patterns, the Woodward craftsmen preferred tiny scroll, and the arcaded (umbrella-carved) fence became almost a trademark of them, as did protruding
tumbler pivots on their lock plates.
The Automatic became very well known and popular in the 1880s. Woodward's not only used the action for its own guns and rifles, it also made guns for the trade. Donald Dallas states that the action can be found with many different makers' names, and there is at least one that was made for John Dickson & Co. of Edinburgh, the famous Scottish maker, engraved in a typically Scottish pattern.
For many years, Woodward Automatics went begging on the used-gun market, but it is a fine action and extremely well made. Any Automatic, regardless of name, was built by Woodward's and offers an opportunity to own a London best at a price far below those demanded for a Boss or Purdey.
The Automatic, by J. Woodward & Sons. The hammerless design is an outgrowth of the firm's 1876 patent for a method of cocking hammers with an underlever and adapted to a hammerless design. It was very popular, and Woodward licensed the design to other gunmakers.
There were other Woodwards in the trade, including two in Birmingham., and one must be careful. As well, J. Woodward's output was not large—only about 5,000 guns and rifles over an 80-vear period—and most were purchased by serious shooters who knew guns. As such, they were put to hard use. Steve Denny, a director of Holland & Holland, says he has seen many "tired old Woodwards" over the years, and many have been either rebarreled or sleeved.
Conversely, there are many Purdevs that were purchased for the name, by men who shot relatively little, and are in very fine condition even after many years.
Purdey has the Woodward records, offers Woodward guns once again in both over/under and side-by-side configurations (although not the Automatic), and a Woodward owner becomes part of the worldwide Purdev clan. Examining a gun from J. Woodward & Sons shows you what gunmaking can be.
Lancaster's Wrist Breaker
By 1884, James Purdey was building almost as many hammerless as hammer guns, all of them on Beesley's 1881 patent. And though the Beesley/Purdev design was on its way to immortality, Frederick Beesley wasn't satisfied. Almost immediately, he began work on a further refined self-opening action that he patented in 1884, No. 425 for that year.
In the patent application, the action is described as a boxlock, but in fact it was so versatile that it could be made with various configurations of locks and tumblers. Most that exist today have a sidelock. but not one that can be readily described as either back-action or bar-action.
The heart of the design is a strong leaf mainspring that runs through the action bar and protrudes from the knuckle. This spring performs three functions. In one, the spring propels the tumbler forward to fire the gun. In the second, when the barrels are unbolted, the center of the spring pushes upward on a cam against the barrel flat, pushing the gun open. And, in the third, as the barrels pivot down, they press on the protruding end of the spring, levering the tumbler back into its cocked position. When the gun is closed, the two cams in the barrel flats press down through the action flats, bearing on the spring and increasing its tension to give it maximum power to propel the tumblers forward once again.
This action has several intrinsic advantages. First, when the gun is open or dismantled, the spring is at rest, so there is no need to relieve it. Second, it has the hidden advantage of a self-opener, which only becomes apparent now, after a century of experience. Self-opening guns outlast others that, though they may have been equal quality when built, have not stood up as well. This is because the constant tension applied on the action by the self-opening mechanism keeps the gun from gradually developing play among its moving parts and eventually shooting loose.
Lancaster's Wrist Breaker, built to Frederick Beesley's 1884 patent. Although found with several variations of springs and locks, the lock plates have the distinctive Lancaster "leg of mutton" shape. As a result, they are often erroneously described as back-action locks.
Beesley began licensing his new design to other gunmakers, the most prominent of which was Charles Lancaster. In 1884. Lancaster was one of London's oldest, largest, and finest gunmakers. The first Charles Lancaster had been Joseph Manton's barrelmaker, before going out on his own, in 1826. By 1884, the company was owned by HAA. Thorn, himself a talented inventor and gunmaker and a superb businessman. Beesley licensed his design to Thorn, and it became the Lancaster "Wrist Breaker," so called because of the supposed difficulty in closing it.
From 1884 until the early 1920s, Lancaster used Beesley's design for its "best" guns and rifles. That design is mainly known by its distinctive "leg of mutton" lockplate, which often leads to its being (sometimes inaccurately) described as a back-action. Another interesting feature is the shape of the frame. It was the first "rounded action" of the type later made famous by John Robertson on the Boss guns.
There are probably more variations on this gun than any other, with at least five known to exist. One variation, the most common, substitutes a V-spring for the leaf, with one arm cocking the tumbler and opening the gun, and the other arm propelling the tumbler forward. When the craze for detachable locks struck London, in the early 1900s, Lancaster redesigned the lock, turning it into a conventional back-action sidelock with a detachable feature for those who wanted it.
Around 1911, as costs rose, Lancaster began offering a sidelock of more conventional appearance, one built on the Rogers action, as its less expensive, second-quality gun. After the Great War, Beesley's design was discontinued, the Rogers became the "best" gun, and, today, Lancasters with more "modern" lock plates command higher prices than the Beesley.
Frederick Beesley considered patent No. 425 superior to the Purdey and built some guns on it himself, as well as licensing it to Lancaster and others. Lancaster made several thousand, and these are the guns most commonly seen today. A specimen in good condition is a superb example of London gunmaking.

Fin de la historia  
Saludos
Volver arriba Ir abajo
viti
Administrador
Administrador
avatar

Mensajes : 17205
Fecha de inscripción : 19/03/2011
Edad : 51

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Mar 13 Ago 2013, 11:10

que pena que no este en español....
Volver arriba Ir abajo
http://www.cazayarmas.org
EBP
Vieja Gloria
Vieja Gloria
avatar

Mensajes : 2144
Fecha de inscripción : 02/01/2012
Edad : 46

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Mar 13 Ago 2013, 11:23

Casi que el traductor no vale pa´ná , dice  cosas tan bonitas como estas :


Shocked Shocked COPIO Y PEGO


En su diseño, el más largo del brazo impulsa el martillo hacia adelante, y la más corta se mueve el martillo del delantero a su posición media-polla.  study study scratch scratch    lol! lol! lol!


que no es lo mismo que


the longer arm propels the hammer forward, and the shorter one moves the hammer back from the striker to its half- cock position.


Aunque...¿ qué sabe naide ?
Volver arriba Ir abajo
viti
Administrador
Administrador
avatar

Mensajes : 17205
Fecha de inscripción : 19/03/2011
Edad : 51

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Mar 13 Ago 2013, 12:30

Jjjjjjjjj
Volver arriba Ir abajo
http://www.cazayarmas.org
campero

3ª
avatar

Mensajes : 1729
Fecha de inscripción : 20/06/2012

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Mar 13 Ago 2013, 16:59

Si es que de Pirineos hacia arriba, considerando la calidad alta de las nuestras, algo tienen que...
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ziro

8ª
avatar

Mensajes : 203
Fecha de inscripción : 10/05/2013
Edad : 45

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Miér 14 Ago 2013, 00:33

Yo como soy una persona sincera diré ...... Que las escopetas españolas nunca tendrán la terminación elegante, detallada, perfeccionista, exclusiva o llamazlo como queráis, que tienen la inglesas. Sin quitarle el mérito a lo nuestro, pero.... Son el sueño de cualquier amante de las armas de caza.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ramse

2ª


Mensajes : 1768
Fecha de inscripción : 06/12/2012

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Miér 14 Ago 2013, 15:06

viti escribió:
que pena que no este en español....
Hola Viti, Elisa domina bien el ingles... 

En un rato podria hacer aunque sea un resumen, muy resumido  

Saludos
Volver arriba Ir abajo
elisa
Administrador
Administrador
avatar

Mensajes : 4912
Fecha de inscripción : 27/05/2011
Edad : 47

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Dom 08 Sep 2013, 10:38

Un resumen resumido del artículo  

El 3 de enero de 1880 un joven armero de Londres llamado Frederick Beesley salió de su casa en el 22 de Queen Street, frente a la Edgware Road y se dirigió a la oficina de patentes de Su Majestad. Llevaba  un montón de papeles.

En la oficina de patentes, Beesley presentó las características provisionales de un mecanismo que describió como  " Autoapertura sin martillo" .  La solicitud de patente fue asignada con el nº 31 de ese año. Seis meses más tarde, el 2 de julio, Beesley confirmó las características completas, y al día siguiente se registró en la Oficina de Patentes Great Seal.

Ninguno de los involucrados, incluso el mismo Beesley, podría haberse imaginado que la patente N º 1880/31 se convertiría en una de las armas  más famosas de la historia con un diseño tan perdurable que todavía estaría en  producción  más de 150 años después.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Este esquema me lo ha cedido Biloaye, para ver mejor el funcionamiento.

Beesley pensó en ofrecer su patente a su antiguo jefe , James Purdey  y éste que estaba en ése momento buscando un diseño sin martillos a la vista digno de su casa, vio las posibilidades.

El 29 de julio de 1880, pagó a Beesley   55 libras por los derechos de su diseño por 14 años. La primera escopeta  se terminó  ese mismo año y hasta la fecha, Purdey nunca ha hecho una “ best side-by-side” siguiendo otros patrones.

Se ha hablado mucho de la naturaleza unilateral de esta transacción. Después de todo, Purdey hizo una fortuna y podría argumentarse, que debe su supervivencia a la excelencia de este diseño. Pero Beesley se benefició también y con creces. En 1880, 55 libras era el precio de una "best "  de la mejor casa, o casi seis meses de salario de un artesano experto.

Muchos años más tarde, las nietas de Beesley dan fe del hecho de que el dinero permitió a su abuelo poder  establecerse en el mundo comercial de las armas, para trasladarse eventualmente desde Edgware Road  a St. James, y convertirse en la competencia  más importante a su antiguo jefe Purdey.

El sistema Woodward "Automatic"  y el Lancaster "Cierre de cabeza de muñeca",  fueron otras dos de las acciones inglesas más famosas y más utilizadas de la era victoriana tardía.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Woodward Automatic .
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Woodward automatic- vista.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Doll Head , de Lancaster.

En 1880, Frederick Beesley tenía sólo 33 años de edad y tanto en los negocios como en su vida libraba una auténtica lucha.

Era un  fabricante de armas cualificado que aprendió con William Moore & Grey y más tarde trabajó para James Purdey, entre otros.  Beesley había estado solo durante casi un año, cuando  perfeccionó el diseño que daría lugar a la patente N º 31.

Ya era reconocido como un experto trabajador perfeccionista y un innovador con talento, pero estas características por sí solas no eran  suficientes para establecerse en el mundo altamente competitivo de la armería en  Londres.

Beesley estaba trabajando en su casa de Queen Street, donde vivía con  su esposa y sus dos hijos,  compartiendo las estancias con otras  doce  personas.

A pesar de que comenzó con una cartera de pedidos propia, en 1871, nueve años más tarde  había fabricado  solo  un centenar de armas de fuego y  no mejoraba su economía.

Incluso en ese momento, el interés de Beesley estaba más centrado en la invención que en la producción. Como más tarde relató, la inspiración para la patente N º 31 le llegó al estudiar el funcionamiento del sistema de bloqueo de John Stanton, patentado en 1867 y utilizado en la gran mayoría de las armas con martillos a la vista a partir de ése momento.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Llaves de Stanton para martillera Purdey 1870.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Llaves Stanton 1873 .
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]



Stanton había reconocido que los dos brazos del muelle en  V tenían potencial para su uso en más de una función en el mecanismo. En su diseño, el lado más largo  impulsa el martillo hacia adelante y el más corto  mueve el martillo desde delante hasta su posición de medio armado.

En la diferencia de  tensión de un brazo al otro  Frederick Beesley vio la base para un diseño revolucionario y que vio la luz finalmente. Con él, Purdey estableció la acción estándar con la cual se han medido todas las  escopetas en todo el mundo desde entonces.

La historia de las escopetas en Londres no comienza ni termina con la patente nº 31 pero sí es cierto que en un periodo  de 30 años se había revolucionado el mundo de las armas.

Este período en la fabricación de armas por lo general comienza con la Gran Exposición de 1851, lo cual es razonable, ya que fue allí donde Casimiro Lefaucheux mostró su acción de retrocarga.

Esta acción llevó a Joseph Lang a producir la primera pieza en Londres. Pero hay mucho más que eso. Entre 1840 y 1880 se revolucionó  la fabricación de armas inglesas y la sociedad en sí.

En 1840, la reina Victoria se casó con su primo, el príncipe alemán Alberto. El príncipe trajo con él a Inglaterra un amor apasionado por el tiro y la caza.

Desde Waterloo, los aristócratas ingleses habían sido unos entusiastas cazadores y muchas  propiedades fueron conocidas por sus cacerias. Con el visto bueno real, el entusiasmo por éste pasatiempo envolvió a la sociedad. Afortunadamente, esto coincidió con la expansión del ferrocarril, que permitió viajar con rapidez a puntos muy distantes. Se institucionalizó en ese momento en Inglaterra el “ fin de semana de caza “.

En la Gran Exposición, Lang vio por primera vez  el revolver Lefaucheux  y  se la  pudo poner a disposición del  Principe  Alberto que tenía un gran interés en la industria armera .

La clase alta  había desarrollado una auténtica pasión por disparar armas de fuego y exigió que fueran cada vez mejores y más finas.  

En Londres, los hermanos Manton ya habían fomentado el principio de que un arma de fuego debe ser un buen instrumento, no una simple herramienta. Así, Londres atrajo a los inventores y fabricantes de armas con más talento del país y se dedicó a perfeccionar la escopeta Break-action básica que Joseph Lang dio a conocer en 1853.

Entre 1850 y 1880, las armas cambiaron  de percusión por pistón exterior a fuego central, de avancarga a retrocarga, de martillos a la vista a martillos ocultos y de la pólvora negra a los primeros propulsores sin humo. Nunca antes ni después se ha logrado  en un período de tiempo tan corto un impulso tan importante con un aumento tan serio de la competitividad.

La búsqueda de una mayor rapidez y comodidad en el disparo se inició tan pronto como el cartucho de fuego central reemplazó al de percusión por pistón a principios de 1860 y se dieron  cuenta de que las armas podrían mejorarse de varias maneras. Una era la de encontrar una acción deslizante para el cierre, en la que los pernos de bloqueo se accionarían por su cuenta ya que el arma estaba cerrada, lo que elimina la necesidad de un movimiento adicional para el tirador,  como empujar una palanca. Otro era un medio para amartillar automáticamente. Un tercero era encontrar una manera de expulsar las vainas vacías, en lugar de tener  que retirarlas  manualmente el tirador.

Los fabricantes de armas en todo el país abordaron estos desafíos.
En  la década de 1860, se presentaron más de 100 patentes para diversos tipos de accionamientos semiautomáticos. Varios de ellos se dieron cuenta de que, con el paso a los cartuchos de fuego central, ya no había ninguna necesidad real de mantener los martillos externos. Todos los mecanismos podrían estar dentro del arma.

Al mismo tiempo, se plantearon más preguntas: sin un martillo visible, ¿ cómo puede saber el tirador si el arma está montada?.
Y si está montada y cargada ¿qué tipo de mecanismo de seguridad sería necesario para evitar disparos accidentales?

Lo que hoy en día nos parece normal, habitual y estándar, se inventó y patentó en Inglaterra,  en la década de 1860 y 70.

A pesar de que muchos reafirman a  William Anson y John Deeley, de Westley Richards en Birmingham, con la invención de la primera acción de éste tipo ,( Anson & Deeley boxlock, en 1875) no fueron los primeros, ni siquiera fue el primer éxito  (aunque en términos de números absolutos,  pasó a convertirse en el diseño de  escopeta mayoritario de todos los tiempos).
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Boxlock de Anson & Deeley.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]



Por la década de 1870, varios fabricantes de armas estaban tratando de crear una verdadera acción de martillos ocultos. El principal reto no era mover los mecanismos en el interior, sino encontrar un medio de amartillarlos.

Fuera de este período surgieron cuatro acciones que han logrado un éxito considerable en el tiempo y se realizaron en un número tal que todavía hoy se pueden encontrar a la venta .

Uno  fue inventado en Bristol, otro en Birmingham y dos en Londres.

Uno de ellos es, a falta de un término mejor, un boxlock, mientras que otro es un híbrido a través de un mecanismo que puede ser  utilizado tanto para boxlock como para  sidelock, todos ellos tienen dos características comunes. Una de ellas, es que eran tan buenos que se han adoptado y hecho por lo general bajo licencia por varias compañías. La segunda es que las armas en sí eran tan  robustas que muchas todavía están en uso hoy en día.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Escopeta de Gibbs & Pitt .
Estas acciones son la Gibbs & Pitt (Bristol, 1873), la W & C. Scott (Birmingham, 1878), la “Automátic” de Woodward (London, 1876), y la Lancaster "Cierre de Cabeza de Muñeca" (Londres, 1884).

Cada una tiene un lugar distinto en la historia del desarrollo de las escopetas inglesas y su significado puede entenderse mejor  mirándolas cronológicamente.


La idea de una escopeta sin martillos (Hamerless) o martillos ocultos se remonta a la época de los mosquetes, pero el primer éxito del diseño para ese arma es generalmente reconocida como arma de 1871, de Teófilo Murcott. Este Sr. era un exitoso fabricante de armas de Londres y su diseño emplea mecanismos internos con un  empuje hacia delante para armarlos.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Murcott con cierre Greener .
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Teophile Murcott modelo “ Mousetrap 1871 “.

Dos años más tarde, en Bristol, el fabricante  George Gibbs y su socio Thomas Pitt, diseñaron otra acción de palanca, ésta con el mecanismo en la placa del disparador. Gibbs era un fabricante de armas conocido que trabajó estrechamente con William Metford, y sus fabricados eran muy respetados en todo el país.

Otros fabricantes- incluyendo a James Purdey –comercializaron piezas construidas bajo la patente Gibbs & Pitt (posteriormente en 1875, Anson & Deeley diseñaron la boxlock que se convirtió ya en el estándar mundial para las armas de fuego de aquella época ).
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Sistema Anson & Deeley boxlock patente nº 1756 de 1875 , realizada por John Deeley para Westley Richards.
Ahora vamos a Londres, donde la famosa firma de James Woodward & Sons,  también estaba abordando la cuestión de las armas sin martillos a la vista. James Woodward fue aprendiz de Charles Moore,  fabricante de armas establecido en Londres y  de alta reputación. Con el tiempo, la compañía se convirtió en Moore & Woodward y luego en 1872, en  J. Woodward & Sons.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]



La compañía era conocida por hacer los mejores cañones junto con Purdey y Boss y además eran grandes innovadores.

En 1876, Woodward presentó la patente N º 600, junto con Thomas Southgate, por un mecanismo que emplea una pieza  de empuje hacia adelante que desbloquea los cañones  y automáticamente arma los martillos externos de un arma de fuego convencional. Ellos lo llamaron la "Autómata" o "Automatic", probablemente el primer uso de ésta palabra en relación con las armas de fuego.

La compañía puso en marcha una importante campaña publicitaria en los periódicos, con la licencia de su diseño y la ofreció  a otros fabricantes de armas siempre que estos señalaran su procedencia de diseño . La "Automátic" se convirtió en la punta de lanza de Woodward en la carrera de los  martillos ocultos y fue utilizado tanto para escopetas como para rifles.

La Lancaster se distingue por su pletina y plancheta en forma de “pata de cordero “ con la forma redondeada, totalmente ergonómica.


En Birmingham, W. & C. Scott, uno de los más grandes y sin duda  el más famoso, por ser  uno de los mejores fabricantes de armas inglesas, fue también en busca de un diseño “sin martillos a la vista ”.

Los técnicos de la  empresa decidieron utilizar la apertura de los cañones como mecanismo de armado. También sintió una gran  preocupación en cuanto a cómo  sabría el tirador si el arma estaba monta y lista para el disparo y Scott lo resolvió con su tecnología inverosímil pero patentada como  " Indicador de cristal", vamos un pequeño ojo de buey de cristal a través del cual se podía comprobar el estado de los martillos . Esto, junto con su sistema de bloqueo con barrote transversal hacía inmediatamente reconocible una  Webley & Scott.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]



[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


La acción se conoció como la "Scott Classic" y fue de nuevo, registrada y comercializada bajo patente con otros nombres.

El usuario más famoso fue Holland & Holland, con su modelo más conocido,  la "Clímax", de tal manera que hoy en día muchos creen firmemente que fue ésta casa la que lo inventó.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]



[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Holland & Holland , modelo “ Climax “ de 1.892.
Por 1881, todos estos diseños estaban en producción. Algunas acciones dieron lugar a patentes exclusivas, otras se hicieron bajo licencia o los titulares de las patentes fabricaban armas en la que otros  ponían sus nombres. Sin embargo, lo único  que faltaba era un diseño genérico asequible y disponible para todos.

En 1881, los hermanos Rogers de Birmingham resolvieron  este problema. Los  Rogers fabricaban acciones y las suministraban a los pequeños fabricantes de armas. Patentaron una acción que se convirtió en el diseño estándar para los profesionales que carecían de la suya propia. Ha sido la más común y es la más imitada en todos los diseños de sidelock inglesas, pero es prácticamente desconocida por su nombre real. La característica  reconocible de la Rogers se encuentra en las palancas de armado, que sobresalen del conjunto.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]



Frederick Beesley, después de haber vendido la patente N º 31 a Purdey, estaba en camino de convertirse en "el inventor para  los armeros  de Londres", como ahora se le recuerda.

Cuando murió en 1928, Beesley tenía 25 patentes a su nombre de las cuales, sin duda, la que vendió a  Purdey es la más famosa, pero no la mejor.

Aunque el comercio armeria  de Beesley  en el  2 de St. James lo proclamó "inventor y titular de la escopeta sin martillos de Purdey",  él mismo creía que podría mejorarse y se dispuso a hacerlo.

En 1884, Beesley presentó otra patente, la  N º 425. Al igual que la mayoría de las patentes inglesas, la descripción era deliberadamente vaga, con la intención de  poner a sus rivales en la duda. Describe un ingenioso mecanismo que emplea una sola pieza para realizar tres funciones distintas y vitales de tal manera que una vez disparada, el muelle real aún guardaba energía para la apertura.

Beesley consideró esto una mejora significativa del principio utilizado en el sistema  de Purdey, era mas simple, mas fuerte y con menos movimientos de piezas. Era un mecanismo que podría adaptarse a cualquier sistema boxlock o sidelock y de hecho, aunque la patente se describió inicialmente como para boxlock.

Aunque Beesley hizo algunas armas bajo éstas especificaciones, la mayoría fueron fabricadas por Charles Lancaster, donde se hizo famoso como el "cierre cabeza de muñeca".

Con la presentación de la patente N º 425, la única acción importante que quedaba aún por aparecer era la Holland & Holland "Royal", en 1883. En un  período de 15 años, la escopeta inglesa se había convertido en lo que hoy conocemos.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]


Bar actions de Holland & Holland “ Royal “.
[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]




La acción Gibbs & Pitt fue inventada por George Gibbs y Thomas Pitt de Bristol, patentada en 1873, dos años después del primer diseño del sistema Murcott y dos años antes del de Anson & Deeley. Al igual que la Murcott, era un diseño de palanca de tres posiciones que se podía adaptar a una gran variedad de sistemas de bloqueo, de los cuales el más común es un seguro que actua sobre el disparador y  que sobresale de la acción por delante del guardamonte. La Gibbs & Pitt es muy fuerte y fue utilizada en rifles y escopetas. Donald Dallas, que ha estudiado la historia del comercio inglés y ha escrito varios libros sobre el tema, estima que fueron fabricadas 10.000 armas  bajo este patrón.

Se sabe que James Purdey  utilizó ésta acción al menos  durante el breve período transcurrido entre la aparición de la escopeta sin martillos a la vista y la adopción del sistema de autoapertura Beesley, en 1880.

Aunque la Gibbs & Pitt parece extraña a simple vista es a la vez fuerte y fiable y convierte el arma en ligera y bien equilibrada.

La Gibbs & Pitt fue diseñada en los primeros días de las acciones sin martillos, cuando los armeros estaban experimentando con una gran variedad de sistemas para solventar el problema de la seguridad.


Debido a su característica forma, el cierre  clásico de Scott se describe generalmente como “ Cierre lateral “. Donald Dallas describe el  Scott como " muy bien realizado". También es fuerte y fiable y se ve en todo tipo de armas, desde rifles de pequeño calibre  hasta en  escopetas de calibre .8  Bore.

C. Scott, se fusionó con Philip Webley, en 1897, para convertirse en  la Webley & Scott. En los años siguientes, el nombre de Scott fue grabado en las armas finas de la empresa. Cuando vinieron  los malos tiempos  a partir de 1945, la W. & C Scott , entró en quiebra y más tarde fué adquirida, irónicamente, por la Holland & Holland. El cierre clásico de Scott se puede encontrar en numerosas armas de la época , pero todas fueron hechas por la Scott.

James Woodward & Sons estaba en la cumbre   de  los fabricantes de armas de Londres, estando considerado en la misma categoría que Purdey y Boss.

James,  aprendió el oficio con Charles Moore, e incluyó a su hijos James Jr. y Charles en el negocio  convirtiéndose en J. Woodward & Sons, en 1872. A pesar de que era una pequeña empresa familiar  (fue absorbida por Purdey en 1948 ), los Woodward eran tanto inventores  como fabricantes de armas finas.

En 1876, James Jr., colaboró con el  inventor Thomas Southgate  para patentar  la acción llamada "Autómatic"  (patente N º 600) y como tal, se denomina "La automática".

Tradicionalmente, el principal rival de Woodward ,  fue Boss & Co., hasta que la empresa fue adquirida por John Robertson, en 1892. Robertson no sólo refinó las escopetas deportivas de Boss sino que  inventó la superpuesta con cuna Boss y el disparador único selectivo.

Woodward hizo más o menos lo mismo y hoy, estas superpuestas  son consideradas como las mejores armas que jamás se han hecho y éste fue el motivo principal de que Purdey comprara la empresa, obtener el diseño de las superpuestas en propiedad.

[Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver este vínculo]



Aunque la calidad de sus armas nunca fue cuestionada, los Woodward eran conocidos por ser un tanto iconoclastas. La empresa se decantaba por los cañones de de 29 pulgadas, mientras que otros hacían los suyos en 30.  Woodward destacó por las empuñaduras  semi-pistolet mientras otros insistían en las rectas y su estilo era reconocido por su nuez.  Entre los patrones de grabado, los artesanos de Woodward bordaban el pequeño y delicado Scroll inglés.

La “automática” se hizo muy conocida y popular en la década de 1880. Woodward no sólo  utilizó la acción para sus propias armas sino que también  la vendió a otras casas armeras.  Donald Dallas establece que la acción se puede encontrar con los nombres de muchos fabricantes diferentes y hay al menos una que se hizo para John Dickson & Co. de Edimburgo, el famoso fabricante escocés, grabada con un dibujo típicamente escocés.

Durante muchos años la  Automática de Woodward fue rechazada en el mercado de armas usadas, pero es una muy buena acción y está muy bien hecha. Cualquier automática, independientemente del nombre, fue construida por Woodward y ofrece la oportunidad de tener una autentica “Best London” a un precio muy por debajo del exigido por una Boss o una Purdey.

Había otras escopetas de armeros llamados Woodward en el mercado, dos de ellos en Birmingham. Y hay que tener mucho cuidado para reconocerlas. Además, la producción de James Woodward no fue grande- sólo alrededor de 5.000 escopetas y rifles- y la mayoría fueron compradas por los mejores tiradores que como tales, las dieron un gran uso.  Steve Denny,  director de Holland & Holland, dice que ha visto muchas "Woodwards viejas y muy usadas" a lo largo de los años y a la mayoría ya se les han cambiado los cañones o están  en desuso.

Por el contrario, hay muchas Purdeys que fueron compradas por el nombre y por usuarios que dispararon relativamente poco y se encuentran en muy buen estado, incluso después de muchos años.

Purdey ofrece armas Woodward, tanto superpuestas como paralelas aunque no “la automática” y el dueño de una Woodward pasa a formar parte del emporio Purdey en todo el mundo.

En 1884, James Purdey estaba fabricando  casi tantas armas con martillos a la vista como ocultos, todas ellas bajo la patente de Beesley de 1.881 y aunque el diseño Beesley / Purdey iba camino de la inmortalidad, Frederick Beesley no estaba satisfecho. Casi de inmediato, comenzó a trabajar para refinar la acción de apertura automática que además patentó con el nº 425 de  1.884.

En la solicitud de la patente, la acción se describe como para una boxlock, pero en realidad era tan versátil que se podía hacer con diferentes configuraciones de cierres.
 
El corazón del diseño es un fuerte resorte  que se acciona a través de la barra de la acción y sobresale de la articulación. Este muelle realiza tres funciones. En una, el resorte empuja  hacia adelante para montar el disparador.  En la segunda, cuando se disparan los cartuchos en los cañones , el centro del muelle empuja hacia arriba y propicia la apertura del arma. Y en el tercer movimiento presiona sobre el extremo que sobresale del muelle haciendo palanca y devolviéndola de nuevo a la posición de armado.

Cuando el arma está cerrada, las dos levas de los cañones presionan hacia abajo a través de la acción aumentando la tensión del muelle y dándole la máxima presión para accionar los disparadores de nuevo. Esta acción tiene varias ventajas. En primer lugar, cuando el arma está abierta o desmontada, el muelle está en reposo, por lo que no hay necesidad de quitarle fuerza. En segundo lugar, tiene la ventaja  de una auto-apertura oculta, que  se hace evidente ahora, después de un siglo. Las armas con auto-apertura duran más que otras que, a pesar de que pueden haber sido de la misma calidad cuando se construyeron, no se han conservado  tan bien. Esto es debido a la tensión constante aplicada en la acción por el mecanismo de auto-apertura.

Beesley comenzó a ceder licencias de su nuevo diseño a otros fabricantes de armas, el más destacado de los cuales fue Charles Lancaster. En 1884, Lancaster era  uno de los más antiguos, más grandes y mejores armeros de Londres. El primero, Charles Lancaster,  había sido cañonero de Joseph Manton, antes de marcharse en 1826.

En 1884, la empresa era propiedad de Henry A.A. Thorn, el cual era un inventor con talento, armero y un excelente hombre de negocios.

Beesley cedió la licencia de su diseño a Thorn, y se convirtió en el "Cierre cabeza de muñeca" Lancaster, llamado así por el diseño tan ajustado y la dificultad para realizarlo.

Desde 1884 hasta principios de los años 1920, Lancaster utilizó un diseño de Beesley para sus "Best Guns”. Ese diseño es principalmente conocido por su distintiva forma de la pletina  "Pata de cordero" , que a menudo  se describe ( erróneamente ) como acción trasera.

Otra característica interesante es la forma de la báscula. Fue la primera "acción redondeada" de éste tipo, más tarde popularizada por John Robertson en las Boss.

Probablemente hay más variaciones de esta arma que de cualquier otra, al menos cinco reconocidas. Cuando la moda de los cierres llegó a Londres, en el año 1900, Lancaster había rediseñado el suyo, convirtiéndolo en un cierre lateral back-action y desmontable para aquellos que lo quisieran.

Alrededor de 1911, ya que los costos aumentaron, Lancaster comenzó a ofrecer un cierre lateral de apariencia más convencional, que se construyó a partir de la acción Rogers, resultando más barato. Después de la Gran Guerra, el diseño de Beesley se paralizó,  el sistema de Rogers se convirtió en el “mejor” para las armas y hoy en día, las Lancaster con las llaves  "modernas" alcanzan precios más elevados  que las que montan el sistema  Beesley.

Frederick Beesley consideró la  patente N º 425 superior a la de Purdey y construyó algunas armas para él mismo dando licencia a Lancaster y a otros. Lancaster hizo varios miles, y  son las armas generalmente más vistas a día de  hoy. Una pieza en buen estado es un ejemplo magnífico de la armería tradicional de Londres de principios del siglo XX.

_________________
La Generala, ejem... de tú, por favorrrr ... [Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]  


Última edición por elisa el Dom 08 Sep 2013, 14:17, editado 1 vez
Volver arriba Ir abajo
kartu

7ª
avatar

Mensajes : 607
Fecha de inscripción : 06/07/2011
Edad : 41

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Dom 08 Sep 2013, 12:48

 guauuuuuuuuuuuuu!!!  
Volver arriba Ir abajo
martinal
Moderador
Moderador
avatar

Mensajes : 4938
Fecha de inscripción : 21/03/2011
Edad : 55

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Dom 08 Sep 2013, 20:27

A sus pies por siempre ... gracias.

_________________
UN TECKEL EN LA VIDA, UN TECKEL PARA SIEMPRE. [Tienes que estar registrado y conectado para ver esa imagen]

Luis M.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Enjarao
Vieja Gloria
Vieja Gloria
avatar

Mensajes : 4945
Fecha de inscripción : 17/11/2012

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Dom 08 Sep 2013, 20:54

Jo con el "resumen" Dña. Elisa, ni que lo hubiera hecho yo....   

Muchas gracias por la traducción, pues es imposible que el traductor de Google ni ninguno, sea capaz de darle sentido a un texto técnico, pues los deja en un estado de encriptación sumeria como poco     

Saludos... Enjarao.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
macas
7ª 1/2
7ª 1/2


Mensajes : 414
Fecha de inscripción : 21/12/2011

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Dom 08 Sep 2013, 21:53

La aportacion de Dña Elisa es tremendamente enriquecedor para poder entender un poco el funcionamiento de una escopeta , y ni que decir tiene el aporte instructivo .

Gracias Elisa .
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ziro

8ª
avatar

Mensajes : 203
Fecha de inscripción : 10/05/2013
Edad : 45

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Lun 09 Sep 2013, 02:07

Gracias Elisa!
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ramse

2ª


Mensajes : 1768
Fecha de inscripción : 06/12/2012

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Lun 30 Sep 2013, 02:45

No lo había visto hasta ahora Elisa, excelente, y eso que dices, "resumido" Very Happy   
Muy bueno.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Beltenebros
00
00
avatar

Mensajes : 2510
Fecha de inscripción : 23/01/2012

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Lun 30 Sep 2013, 06:14

Ziro escribió:
Yo como soy una persona sincera diré ...... Que las escopetas españolas nunca tendrán la terminación elegante, detallada, perfeccionista, exclusiva o llamazlo como queráis, que tienen la inglesas. Sin quitarle el mérito a lo nuestro, pero.... Son el sueño de cualquier amante de las armas de caza.
No estoy muy de acuerdo con que la terminación elegante, detallada y perfeccionista sea lo que distingue a las escopetas inglesas de las españolas, ni que las escopetas españolas no puedan serlo tanto como las inglesas. La elegancia, el detalle y la perfección es algo que puede llegarse a imitar, una vez que quede por una gran mayoría (pero una mayoría cualificada) admitido qué es cada uno de esos conceptos o el resultante de los mismos.
Pongamos por ejemplo el frac o el morning dress. A efectos de elegancia nocturna y diurna respectivamente, da lo mismo que se concibieran en un lugar u otro, y quien lo porta "con la percha adecuada", va elegantemente vestido sin más.
Lo que ni las españolas ni las de ninguna otra parte pueden llegar a imitar de las armas inglesas, es su concepción. O dicho de otra manera: sus armeros y su inconmensurable dedicación a dotar a sus armas de características propias.
Nosotros hemos tenido armeros capaces de fusilar cualquier tipo de mecanismo habido y por haber, pero no hemos tenido armeros capaces de inventar mecanismos verdaderamente novedosos o personalísimos, con alguna rara excepción.
Es decir: Una escopeta Greener se distingue por determinados detalles técnicos que la hacen diferente a todas las demás, lo mismo sucede con una Lancaster o una Dickson, Beesley, Holland o Richards, etc, etc. Son armas con particularidades únicas y propias que las distinguen del resto. Esto es lo que no ha existido jamás en España.
Nuestra postura, con algún aporte como excepción, fue la de: si ya está inventado y es bueno, pues para qué vamos a ahondar más. Y en función de las capacidades individuales se adoptaban uno, dos, tres o seis sistemas de disparo distintos según la gama de la escopeta que se fuera a parir, pero eran indistinguibles.
No existen (dejemos un casi, por si las moscas) básculas en escopetas españolas de las que se pueda decir sólo con verlas: esta escopeta sólo puede ser de tal o de cual.
No existen llaves que al desmontarlas uno diga: esta llave es de esta escopeta y no de ninguna otra.
No hay patrones de grabado propios que te den una pista indefectible para identificar a un armero.
Lo original no puede ser imitado salvo después de creado, pero para eso es necesario crear.
Bajo mi modesto criterio creo que estas son las verdaderas diferencias entre la industria escopetera artesanal de unos y otros, entendiendo que ese "otros" se refiere -en mayor o menor grado comparativo- a todos los demás, no sólo a las escopetas españolas.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
cazuma

9ª


Mensajes : 126
Fecha de inscripción : 08/05/2011
Edad : 66

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Lun 30 Sep 2013, 08:22

Excelente trabajo Elisa, viniendo de tí no podia ser menos.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Dersu Uzala

9ª
avatar

Mensajes : 158
Fecha de inscripción : 29/04/2013
Edad : 50

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Lun 30 Sep 2013, 08:52

Gracias Ramse por sacar a la luz este tema con semejante artículo, y también por "picar" a Elisa para que realizara semejante "Resumen".
Gracias Elisa por tan impresionante trabajo, nunca dejas de sorprenderme con tus valiosísimas aportaciones a este nuestro foro.
Gracias maestro Biloaye por su siempre iluminadora aportación documental.
Gracias Beltenebros por tu extensa opinión sobre las armas inglesas frente a las españolas/europeas, para mi opinión das en el clavo, totalmente de acuerdo contigo.
Gracias al resto de intervinientes por vuestras opiniones e intervenciones.
Gracias al foro por propiciar temas como este. Es una verdadera Universidad sobre armas y caza, y esta "asignatura" la de "Historia y concepto de la escopeta fina" una de las que más me gusta.
Me despido diciendo algo que no se si he mencionado:
GRACIAS.
Vicente (Dersu Uzala)
Volver arriba Ir abajo
jeffery 16
Mostacilla
Mostacilla


Mensajes : 66
Fecha de inscripción : 16/02/2013
Edad : 45

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Lun 30 Sep 2013, 09:52

Solo me cabe otro GRACIAS!

Mi amigo Vicente lo resume a la perfección, es un lujo tenerlo por aquí.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Antonio

9ª
avatar

Mensajes : 155
Fecha de inscripción : 01/05/2011
Edad : 53

MensajeTema: Escopeta   Lun 30 Sep 2013, 11:41

Totalmente de acuerdo con Ziro
Volver arriba Ir abajo
macas
7ª 1/2
7ª 1/2


Mensajes : 414
Fecha de inscripción : 21/12/2011

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Lun 30 Sep 2013, 17:17

Y que se puede decir de las escopetas de cinco cierres de Juan Bautista Arrizabalaga , a mi me parece extraudinario y tampoco se le da mucho aprecio , vale que no hagan falta tantos cierres , pero tamvien tiene su merito mecanizar todos esos cierres.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Beltenebros
00
00
avatar

Mensajes : 2510
Fecha de inscripción : 23/01/2012

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Lun 30 Sep 2013, 17:21

macas escribió:
Y que se puede decir de las escopetas de cinco cierres de Juan Bautista Arrizabalaga , a mi me parece extraudinario y tampoco se le da mucho aprecio , vale que no hagan falta tantos cierres , pero tamvien tiene su merito mecanizar todos esos cierres.
Que sí, que sí, que hay excepciones. Pocas, pero afortunadamente algunas y esa que mencionas en particular, a mí me gusta mucho.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
macas
7ª 1/2
7ª 1/2


Mensajes : 414
Fecha de inscripción : 21/12/2011

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Lun 30 Sep 2013, 17:39

Pues me alegro que le guste .

Estoy de acuerdo en que los armeros Españoles , digamos que se han conformado con ir un paso detras de los Ingleses , yo pienso que de alguna ,manera a ellos les iba vien porque trabajavan para los Ingleses y a los Ingleses les iba mejor porque las hacian tam bien como ellos y abarataban costes .
Volver arriba Ir abajo
faconazo
Vieja Gloria
Vieja Gloria
avatar

Mensajes : 1021
Fecha de inscripción : 11/04/2013
Edad : 74

MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   Mar 01 Oct 2013, 03:28

Beltenebros escribió:
Ziro escribió:
Yo como soy una persona sincera diré ...... Que las escopetas españolas nunca tendrán la terminación elegante, detallada, perfeccionista, exclusiva o llamazlo como queráis, que tienen la inglesas. Sin quitarle el mérito a lo nuestro, pero.... Son el sueño de cualquier amante de las armas de caza.
No estoy muy de acuerdo con que la terminación elegante, detallada y perfeccionista sea lo que distingue a las escopetas inglesas de las españolas, ni que las escopetas españolas no puedan serlo tanto como las inglesas. La elegancia, el detalle y la perfección es algo que puede llegarse a imitar, una vez que quede por una gran mayoría (pero una mayoría cualificada) admitido qué es cada uno de esos conceptos o el resultante de los mismos.
Pongamos por ejemplo el frac o el morning dress. A efectos de elegancia nocturna y diurna respectivamente, da lo mismo que se concibieran en un lugar u otro, y quien lo porta "con la percha adecuada", va elegantemente vestido sin más.
Lo que ni las españolas ni las de ninguna otra parte pueden llegar a imitar de las armas inglesas, es su concepción. O dicho de otra manera: sus armeros y su inconmensurable dedicación a dotar a sus armas de características propias.
Nosotros hemos tenido armeros capaces de fusilar cualquier tipo de mecanismo habido y por haber, pero no hemos tenido armeros capaces de inventar mecanismos verdaderamente novedosos o personalísimos, con alguna rara excepción.
Es decir: Una escopeta Greener se distingue por determinados detalles técnicos que la hacen diferente a todas las demás, lo mismo sucede con una Lancaster o una Dickson, Beesley, Holland o Richards, etc, etc. Son armas con particularidades únicas y propias que las distinguen del resto. Esto es lo que no ha existido jamás en España.
Nuestra postura, con algún aporte como excepción, fue la de: si ya está inventado y es bueno, pues para qué vamos a ahondar más. Y en función de las capacidades individuales se adoptaban uno, dos, tres o seis sistemas de disparo distintos según la gama de la escopeta que se fuera a parir, pero eran indistinguibles.
No existen (dejemos un casi, por si las moscas) básculas en escopetas españolas de las que se pueda decir sólo con verlas: esta escopeta sólo puede ser de tal o de cual.
No existen llaves que al desmontarlas uno diga: esta llave es de esta escopeta y no de ninguna otra.
No hay patrones de grabado propios que te den una pista indefectible para identificar a un armero.
Lo original no puede ser imitado salvo después de creado, pero para eso es necesario crear.
Bajo mi modesto criterio creo que estas son las verdaderas diferencias entre la industria escopetera artesanal de unos y otros, entendiendo que ese "otros" se refiere -en mayor o menor grado comparativo- a todos los demás, no sólo a las escopetas españolas.
Una clase del amigo Beltenebros!!!!!!!!     
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Contenido patrocinado




MensajeTema: Re: More than Purdey By Terry Wielad   

Volver arriba Ir abajo
 
More than Purdey By Terry Wielad
Volver arriba 
Página 1 de 1.

Permisos de este foro:No puedes responder a temas en este foro.
Caza & Armas ::  LA ARMERIA :: La Escopeta-
Cambiar a: