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 William Moore

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MensajeTema: William Moore   Dom 31 Ene 2016, 01:24

Escopeta de percusión.

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Escopeta de perrillos.
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MensajeTema: Re: William Moore   Dom 31 Ene 2016, 10:38

William Moore was born in 1781. In 1808 he was recorded as being in business (description of business unknown) at 118 Whitechapel. He was also recorded as being a stocker for Joseph Manton, probably from 1809 to 1820. It is possible that he was related to Charles Moore of the firm of that name (and later Moore & Woodward).

From 1818 to 1853 William Moore lived at Colchester Road, Edgeware. In 1820 he established his own business at that address, but by 1828 his trade had increased to the point where he required larger premises so he opened a shop at 78 Edgeware Road.

In 1829 he opened a stock making business at Court, 4 Whittall Street, Birmingham. This may also have been a purchasing office and finishing workshop.

In 1835 a percussion lock developed by Moore was rejected by the Board of Ordnance.

In 1836 William Moore was appointed Gunmaker-in-Ordinary to King William IV, and in that year the name of the firm changed to William Moore & Co.

In 1837 or 1838 the firm were appointed gunmakers to Prince Albert.

Also in 1837 the business at Court, 4 Whittall Street moved to 35 Loveday Street, it was recorded up to 1845.

In 1838 William Moore and William Harris became partners in the firm of Moore & Harris, also at 35 Loveday Street, William Harris also traded from these premises in his own name (it is likely that William Harris was related to Alfred Harris who traded as a gun barrel maker in Birmingham - see Joseph Harris of Lionel Street).

In 1840 the partnership was recorded at 36 Loveday Street trading as gun and pistol makers; at least some of the guns sold were marked Moore & Harris, London, the partnership probably used William Moore's address. The firm appears to have supplied the trade as well as William Moore in London, some of the guns sold were marked "London" and were proved in London. The partnership also developed an export trade to the USA.

William Moore was recorded in the 1841 census livng at 78a Edgeware Road with his wife, Sarah (b.1806) and a servant. No other census entries have been found. The 1851 census records 78a Edgeware Road as being a milliner's shop.

From 1840 to 1845 William Moore also traded in his own name as a gunsmith from 35 Loveday Street. Harris ceased trading in his own name in 1845.

In 1847 William Moore and William Parker Grey, who had been clerk and then manager for Joseph Manton, went into partnership in London at 78 Edgeware Road, they operated as Wm Moore & Grey but Wm Moore also continued to trade as Wm Moore & Co, presumably in respect of specific aspects of his business.

In 1852 William Moore and William Harris patented a percussion revolver which was produced in limited quantities (patent No. 69).

In 1854 William Moore and William Grey started to trade as William Moore & Grey from 43 Old Bond Street, but William Grey and his son, F H Grey, also started to trade as William Grey & Son at 41 Old Bond Street. William Moore may also have traded from 43 Old Bond Street as William Moore & Co. Between 1854 and 1859 the firm of William Moore and William Grey, like William Moore & Co, were appointed gunmakers to Prince Albert.

By 1859 in Birmingham, Moore & Harris had expanded into barrel and lock making and in 1861 they moved to the Great Western Gun Works at 91 Constitution Hill.

In 1861 Frederick Beesley was apprenticed to William Grey at William Moore & Co at 43 Old Bond Street.

In 1862 the partnership of William Moore and William Harris exhibited military and sporting guns at the International Exhibition in London.

Between 1862 and 1865 the firm advertised the fact that guns not made by them were being engraved with the name Wm Moore & Co, London.

In 1864, perhaps because of temporary financial problems (American Civil War contracts ending?) or because William Moore died (no date is known), the business at the Great Western Gun Works at 91 Constitution Hill was sold at auction; the buyers were a partnership composed of "Moore and Harris" and a Mr Richards. The Moore could have been William Moore or his wife, or William Moore Jnr (?), Mr Richards was probably Westley Richards.

However, the new partnership closed within a year and the business was sold to W & C Scott & Son who valued the firm's USA export market. The firm of Moore & Harris, perhaps now owned by William Harris, probably moved to London, they were known to have been trading in 1867 from 2 Long Acre, London. When they ceased trading is not known, but it may have been prior to 1870 or even up to 1877.

In 1866 Henry Atkin moved from Purdey to work for the firm, he founded his own business in 1877.

In 1867 F H Grey, who by this time had probably taken over from his father, patented internal strikers on hammer guns (No. 2743).

In about 1873 the name of the Moore & Grey partnership may have temporarily changed to William Moore, Grey & Co. In 1878 the firm became a limited liability company, William Moore & Grey Ltd but in 1889 it reverted to unlimited liability.

In 1893, when the Inanimate Bird Shooting Association was formed, a "Mr Harris of Moore & Grey" attended. Apparently, he ran the Wealdstone Gun Club which was based at Harrow.

At some time prior to 1896 the firm registered a patent (No. 18582) for an automatic safety (rifle locks and triggers?).

In 1896 the firm moved to 165 Piccadilly and in 1902 to 8 Craven Street, Strand. In about 1897 they opened a branch at 11 The Arcade, Aldershot; Aldershot was and still is the "home" of the British army. It appears that, in common with other gunmakers at the time, the firm's sales did not warrant in-house gunmaking facilities, and that they were buying guns from Cogswell & Harrison.

In 1908 Cogswell & Harrison took over the firm, and Robert Grey joined them. This was probably when the Aldershot branch closed.

In 1917 Cogswell & Harrison moved the company to their own premises at 226 Strand and William Moore & Grey ceased to trade under their own name.

In 1928 Robert Grey died, also in that year Cogswell & Harrison left the Strand and operated only from 168 Piccadilly. They later included a "Moorgrey" model in their range of guns, this was a low priced model which was never very popular.

Some records of the company are held by Cogswell & Harrison.

Names used by the firm:
William Moore & Co; Moore & Harris; Wm Moore & Grey; Wm Moore Grey & Co; Wm Moore & Grey; William Moore & Grey (Ltd)
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MensajeTema: Re: William Moore   Dom 31 Ene 2016, 10:39

In 1829 Wm Moore (who was already in business in London) opened a stock making business at Court, 4 Whittall Street, Birmingham. This may also have been a purchasing office. In 1837 the stock making business moved to 35 Loveday Street, Birmingham where it was recorded up to 1845. This seems to have been the start of a long relationship which William Moore had with William Harris who occupied 35 and 36 Loveday Street at various times. William Harris was born in 1817 in Aston, Birmingham. In 1838 William Moore and William Harris were recorded as partners in the firm of Moore & Harris, also at 35 Loveday Street, but William Harris also traded from these premises in his own name. In 1840 the partnership was recorded at 36 Loveday Street trading as gun and pistol makers; at least some of the guns sold were marked "London" and were marked Moore & Harris, London and were proved in London. Harris ceased trading in his own name in 1845.

They appear to have supplied the trade as well as William Moore in London, and they also developed an export trade to the USA. William Harris was recorded in the 1851 census as a master gun maker employing 5 men. He was living at 38 Great Hampton Street, Birmingham, with his wife Emma Lucy (nee Hedder b.1813 in Northampton), and his mother-in-law and a servant. On 1 October 1852 William Moore and William Harris patented a hinged percussion revolver which was produced in limited quantities (patent No. 69). By 1859 in Birmingham, Moore & Harris had expanded into barrel and lock making and in 1861 they moved to the Great Western Gun Works at 91 Constitution Hill. The 1861 census records William Harris and Emma Lucy living at 36 Loveday Street. William described himself as a gun maker. In 1862 the partnership of William Moore and William Harris exhibited military and sporting guns at the International Exhibition in London. In 1864, perhaps because of temporary financial problems (American Civil War contracts ending?) or because William Moore died (no date of death is known though my own suspicion is it was 1859), the business at the Great Western Gun Works at 91 Constitution Hill was sold at auction; the buyers were a partnership composed of "Moore and Harris" (I suspect a company name) and a Mr Richards. Mr Richards was probably Westley Richards. In 1864 and 1865 Westley Richards joined Moore & Harris in a partnership established to save the manufacturing business of Moore & Harris from closure. The venture failed and, because Moore & Harris had a fairly substantial business exporting to the USA, the business was bought at auction by W & C Scott & Son.

Moore & Harris are known to have been trading in 1867 from a showroom at 2 Long Acre, London. When it ceased trading is not known, but it may have been prior to 1870 or even up to 1877. William Harris was recorded in the 1871 census living with Emma at 126 Buckingham Palace Road, London, clearly having moved down from Birmingham. He described himself as manager of a gun factory. There are no known extant gun production records for Moore & Harris.

Gun examples I have come across include:
1: 30" Damascus barrels, not choked. 3" chambers. Early Birmingham proofs. Side lever action. This is a very early breech loader. Research reveals that Moore & Harris made guns under military contract and also made sporting guns for export to the Great Western Firearms Company of Pittsburgh. They also developed a reputation for converting muzzle loading shotguns into breech loaders.
2: No 5987-Single bead sight on a solid concave rib marked "MOORE & HARRIS, LONDON. LAMINATED STEEL". Light scroll engraved hammer and lock plates. Lock plates marked "MOORE & HARRIS" with game bird scenes on the lock plates and trigger guard. Nicely figured checkered walnut forearm and straight grip stock with flat butt plate and initial oval. Complete with a leather and double faced embossed shot bag marked "4 / lbs". G
3: Moore & Harris, serial no. 1909, 14-bore, with re-browned twist signed sighted barrels, engraved patent breeches each with platinum plug, signed border, scroll and game scene engraved back-action locks, figured walnut half-stock with chequered grip and fore-end, re-blued engraved iron mounts, silver escutcheon, and original brass-mounted ramrod with London proof marks and maker's mark 'M&H'.
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MensajeTema: Re: William Moore   Dom 31 Ene 2016, 10:41

WILLIAM MOORE, gunmaker, 118 Whitechapel, London, 1808; Colchester St, (possible workshops), 1818-52; 78 Edgware Rd, 1828-46; WILLIAM MOORE & WILLIAM GREY, gunmakers, s.a. 1847-53; WILLIAM MOORE & CO., 43 Old Bond St, 1854--'72; WILLIAM MOORE GREY & CO., s.a. 1873; WILLIAM MOORE & GREY, s.a.1874--'78; WILLIAM MOORE & GREY LTD, s.a. 1879-95; (LTD dropped 1889), 165 Piccadilly, 1896-1902; 8 Craven St, Strand, 1902-14, also at II The Arcade Aldershot, Surrey, e.1897-c.1905 (COGSWELL & HARRISON LTD, succeeded to the bus. 1908); 226 Strand, 1915-25, q.v. COGSWELL & HARRISON LTD (some record of MOORGREY guns from 4900 series onwards contained in those of COGSWELL & HARRISON), h.

William Moore and William Parker Grey, the founders of this firm, were originally employed by Joseph Manton - Moore as his stocker and Grey as his clerk and manager. They seem to have gone their separate ways initially. Moore described by Beaufoy as 'a very ingenious workman and an excellent shot', set up in his own name at 118 Whitechapel in 1808 and thence from 1818 to 1852 at Colehester St. When, in 1828, he moved to 78 Edgware Rd, where he was to remain on his own until 1846, the former premises were kept on as workshops or additional shop premises. In 1836 he was appointed Gunmaker-in-Ordinary to William IV. From 1847 to 1853 he teamed up with Grey as William Moore & William Gtey Gunmakers at the Edgware Rd address until the business moved in 1854 to 43 Old Bond St where it was to remain until 1872, but under the name of William Moore & Co. Grey, it seems, survived Moore and it is known that he was still living when the business was at those Bond St premises, since Frederick Beesley (aged 15) was apprenticed to him there, giving him a direct link back to the Joe Manton era. Henry Atkin, founder of the firm of that name, also went to Moore & Grey around 1866 for 10 years.
FH Grey, presumably the son of William, registered one or two patents in the late 1860s and early 1870S for such items as internal strikers for guns with external hammers (some feel a possible early move towards the modern hammerless gun) and, in conjunction with a Mr. Harris, another for underlever bolting on a gun action.
In 1873 the name was recorded as William Moore, Grey & Co., presumably to reflect the contribution of FH Grey, and the following year it was recorded as William Moore & Grey at No.43. The firm became a limited company in 1878. In 1896 the business apparently ceased to be a limited company and returned to its previous name as an unincorporated business. In that year it moved to new premises at I6S Piccadilly. These changes in name and corporate status may to some extent have been the result of careless recording in the directories.
In 1902 the business moved on to 8 Craven St in the Strand and in 1908 it was acquired by Cogswell & Harrison Ltd which was itself at No.223. When Cogswell's Strand premises were finally closed down in '928, it was soon after the death of one Robert Grey who had been working there. He may well have been a surviving family member taken on at the time of the acquisition. Cogswells at one stage marketed a model of gun under the name 'Moorgrey', clearly another relic of the original business.
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MensajeTema: Re: William Moore   Dom 31 Ene 2016, 10:42

Name William Harris
Address1 38 Great Hampton Street; Loveday Street
City/Town Birmingham
Country United Kingdom
Trade Gun maker
Other Address
Dates 1853

Notes
In 1829 William Moore of 118 Whitechapel, London, opened a stock making business at Court, 4 Whittall Street, Birmingham. This may also have been a purchasing office for guns and revolvers and gun parts. In 1837 the address changed to 35 Loveday Street where it was recorded up to 1845. In 1838 William Moore and William Harris became partners in the firm of Moore & Harris at 35 Loveday Street, William Harris also started trading from these premises in his own name. In 1840 the partnership was recorded at 36 Loveday Street trading as gun and pistol makers; at least some of the guns sold were marked Moore & Harris, London (these were proved in London). It is possible that William Harris was related to Alfred Harris who traded as a gun barrel maker in Birmingham (see Joseph Harris of Lionel Street).

From 1840 to 1845 William Moore traded in his own name as a gunsmith from 35 Loveday Street (the terms "gunsmith" and "gun maker" were interchangeable at that time), William Harris probably ceased trading in his own name in 1845. In the 1851 census William Harris was recorded as a master gun maker employing 5 men. He was living at 38 Great Hampton Street with his wife Emma Lucy (nee Hedder b.1816 in Northampton), his mother-in-law Harriet Hedder (b.1777 in Uxbridge, Middlesex) and a servant. In 1852 William Moore and William Harris patented a percussion revolver which was produced in limited quantities (patent No. 69). At about this time they may also have made needle-fire rifles. The needle-fire rifle was perfected in about 1840 by Nicolaus Von Dreyse of Sommerda, Germany, and remained in production until about 1870. Needle-fire rifles were also made by Chassepot (France), Carl (Russia), Carcano (Italy), Hagstrom (Swedish) and Jean Jacques Rissack (Belgium). Moore & Harris certainly made Rissack needle-fire rifles.

By 1859 in Birmingham the partnership had expanded into barrel and lock making, and in 1861 they moved to the Great Western Gun Works at 91 Constitution Hill. It is possible that William Moore retired or died at this time, as has been reported, but it is more likely he died in 1863/4. The 1861 census records William Harris as a gun maker living at 36 Loveday Street with Emma Lucy and Edwin Hedder (b.1819 in London) and a servant. In 1862 the partnership exhibited military and sporting guns at the International Exhibition in London, they supplied the trade as well as William Moore in London, and they developed an export market in the USA. In 1864, perhaps because of temporary financial problems (American Civil War contracts ending?) or more likely because William Moore died, the manufacturing partnership at the Great Western Gun Works at 91 Constitution Hill was almost bankrupt and it was sold at auction; the buyers were the partnership of Moore and Harris and a Mr Richards. The Moore could have been a successor to William Moore (Mrs Moore / William Moore Jnr?), and Mr Richards was probably Westley Richards. However, the new partnership with Mr Richards closed within a year and the business was sold to W & C Scott & Son. W & C Scott & Son may well have bought the firm because of the Moore & Harris USA export business.

Moore & Harris continued trading, in 1867 they were known to have occupied premises at 2 Long Acre, London. By the time of the 1871 census William and Emma Lucy had moved to London where William described himself as manager of a gun factory. This was the Moore & Grey works at 43 Old Bond Street. William and Emma Lucy were living at 126 Buckingham Palace Road. The 1881 census, by which time William was 64 years old, gives exactly the same information. It would appear that John B Grey had died by 1881 and William Harris took over the running of Moore & Grey at 43 Old Bond Street.

On 17 October 1892 W Moore & Grey and William Harris registered patent No. 18582) for an intercepting safety sear for rifle locks and triggers. In 1893, when the Inanimate Bird Shooting Association was formed, a "Mr Harris of Moore & Grey" attended. Apparently, he ran the Wealdstone Gun Club which was based at Harrow. It is likely that William Harris died in the early 1890s.

See William Moore of 118 Whitechapel, London.
William Moore was born in 1781, where is not known. In 1808 a William Moore was recorded as being in business (description of business unknown) at 118 Whitechapel. A William Moore was also recorded as being a stocker for Joseph Manton, probably from 1809 to 1820. It is possible that he was related to Charles Moore of the firm of that name (later known as Moore & Woodward).
From 1818 to 1853 William Moore lived at Colchester Road, Edgeware. In 1820 he established his own business at that address, but by 1828 his trade had increased to the point where he required larger premises so he opened a shop at 78 Edgeware Road.

In 1829 he opened a stock making business at Court, 4 Whittall Street, Birmingham but it is likely that he became gun maker soon afterwards. In 1835 a percussion lock developed by Moore was rejected by the Board of Ordnance. In 1836 William Moore was appointed Gunmaker-in-Ordinary to King William IV so it is apparent that he had significant influence in the trade and produced guns in arrange of qualities which were probably sold from premises somewhere in London. In that year the name of the firm changed to William Moore & Co.

In 1837 the stock making business at Court, 4 Whittall Street moved to 35 Loveday Street where it was recorded up to 1845. This seems to have been the start of a long relationship which William Moore had with William Harris who occupied 35 and 36 Loveday Street at various times. In 1838 William Moore was appointed gunmaker to Prince Albert. William Harris was born in 1817 in Aston, Birmingham. He may have been related to Alfred Harris who traded as a gun barrel maker in Birmingham (see also Joseph Harris of Lionel Street). In 1838 William Moore and William Harris were recorded as partners in the firm of Moore & Harris, also at 35 Loveday Street, but William Harris also traded from these premises in his own name.

In 1840 the partnership was recorded at 36 Loveday Street trading as gun and pistol makers; at least some of the guns sold were marked "London" and were marked Moore & Harris, London, and were proved in London. The partnership probably used William Moore's address at 78 Edgeware Road, London. They appear to have supplied the trade as well as William Moore in London, and they also developed an export trade to the USA. William Moore was recorded in the 1841 census living at 78a Edgeware Road with his wife, Sarah (b.1806 place of birth unknown) and a servant. No other census entries have been found and the 1851 census records 78a Edgeware Road as being a milliner's shop. From 1840 to 1845 William Moore also traded in his own name as a gunsmith from 35 Loveday Street. Harris ceased trading in his own name in 1845.
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MensajeTema: Re: William Moore   Dom 31 Ene 2016, 16:46

Gracias por las fotos. Bonitas escopetas y finos grabados. El resto, no opino...
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MensajeTema: Re: William Moore   Dom 31 Ene 2016, 20:56

jofogo escribió:
Gracias por las fotos. Bonitas escopetas y finos grabados. El resto, no opino...

Hola jofogo, William Moore trabajo nada más y nada menos, para Joseph Manton, el padre de las criaturas que ahora conocemos Very Happy
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MensajeTema: Re: William Moore   Dom 31 Ene 2016, 21:13

Gracias por el resumen.
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MensajeTema: Re: William Moore   Dom 31 Ene 2016, 23:49

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MensajeTema: Re: William Moore   Lun 01 Feb 2016, 00:31

Espera un poco Ramse, que estoy haciendo el curso de inglés de babbel por el móvil, en un rato te digo algo...

Por un momento pense que me había metio en un foro de la perfida Albión... lol!

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MensajeTema: Re: William Moore   Lun 01 Feb 2016, 20:28

Enjarao escribió:
Espera un poco Ramse, que estoy haciendo el curso de inglés de babbel por el móvil, en un rato te digo algo...
Por un momento pense que me había metio en un foro de la perfida Albión... lol!

Que jodido el Paco  Smile , no pretenderás que traduzca todo eso, verdad? Esos apuntes son para los estudiosos, para el resto ya vale con el resumen (muy resumido) que le puse a jofogo. Smile  Smile  Smile
Lo que he pretendido es juntar toda la información que he encontrado sobre William Moore, no creo que haya mucha más información.


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MensajeTema: Re: William Moore   Lun 01 Feb 2016, 21:30

Pues el resumen que le hiciste para el compañero... Nos vale para alguno más jajajajaja jajajajaja, gracias y un saludo, la verdad te lo Curras con las aportaciones que hacés, yo si fuera en portugués igual lo entienda pero el inglés y yo no nos entendemos... Eso si sus armas me gustan y mucho
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